News

Hannah Farber reviewed Bank Notes and Shinplasters, along with books by Emma Hart, Caitlin Rosenthal, and Jeffrey Sklansky in Practical Americans, a review for the William and Mary Quarterly.

Federal Reserve Board Governor Lael Brainard included a citation to Bank Notes and Shinplasters in her speech on Private Money and Central Bank Money as Payments Go Digital: an Update on CBDCs.

Bank Notes and Shinplasters: the Rage for Paper Money in the Early Republic has been named as a finalist for the 2021 Hagley Prize in Business History given by the Business History Conference for the best book in Business History (broadly defined).

My book talk for Bank Notes and Shinplasters: the Rage for Paper Money in the Early Republic, held online by the Massachusetts Historical Society, aired on C-Span3 as part of their American HistoryTV series. Watch it here: MHS Book Talk on C-Span 3

I was interviewed and quoted about shinplasters and currency shortages by Alan Yuhas in his New York Times piece, “Who Will Miss the Coins When They’re Gone?

I was interviewed about Bank Notes and Shinplasters: the Rage for Paper Money in the Early Republic on the Age of Jackson Podcast. Listen to the episode here.

My opinion piece, “Will cover-19 end the use of paper money”, in the Washington Post ran on May 15, 2020 in the Made by History column.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2020/05/15/will-covid-19-end-use-paper-money/

I participated in the History Summit as one of the featured authors. Watch my video about my new book, Bank Notes and Shinplasters: the Rage for Paper Money in the Early Republic

https://www.historysummit.com/joshua-greenberg

Be sure to follow my daily posts of paper money on Twitter. New themes each week on the hashtag: #banknotesandshinplasters

About Me

Jrgreenberg@me.com

@joshrgreenberg

#banknotesandshinplasters (I post daily images of 19th century paper money)

I was born and raised in New Jersey. I earned a BA in History from the University of California, Santa Cruz and a PhD in American History from American University in Washington DC. After a fellowship at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, my first job was at the University of Miami. I then moved to Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts and taught for 12 years while receiving tenure and promotion to full professor. I currently serve as the editor for Commonplace: the journal of early American life and teach at Ohlone College in California. My research and writing examines the intersection of social, cultural, economic, and political history in the nineteenth century.